Brave New World Book By Aldous Huxley (PDF-Summary-Review-Online Reading-Download)

Brave New World is a dystopian novel by the English author Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Set primarily in a futuristic world state, whose citizens are environmentally designed in a social hierarchy based on intelligence, the novel anticipates enormous scientific advances in technology reproduction, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation and classical conditioning that combine to make a dystopian society that is challenged by a single individual: the protagonist of the story. Huxley followed this book with a reassessment in the form of an essay, Brave New World Revisited (1958), and with his final novel, Island (1962), the utopian counterpart. The novel is often compared to Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (1949).

In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World as # 5 on its list of the 100 best English novels of the 20th century. In 2003, Robert McCrum, writing for The Observer, included Brave New World chronologically in n. ° 53 in "the 100 best major novels of all time", and the novel was listed at #87 on The Big Read survey By the BBC.

Pages: 311 (1932 ed.); 63,766 words
Genres: Novel, Science Fiction, Dystopian Fiction

Book Summary
Brave New World is a dystopian novel by English author Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Set primarily in a futuristic world state, inhabited by genetically modified citizens and a social hierarchy based on intelligence, the novel anticipates enormous scientific advances in technology reproduction, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation and classical conditioning that combine to make a dystopian society that is challenged by a single individual: the protagonist of the story.

Book Club Questions

Book Review
Aldous Huxley's journey of strength, Brave New World is a darkly satirical vision of a "utopian" future, where humans are genetically bred and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively serve a dominant order. A powerful work of speculative fiction that has captivated and terrified readers for generations remains remarkably relevant for this day as a warning to keep in mind as we move towards tomorrow and as stimulating and satisfying entertainment.

About The Author
Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. He spent the latter part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death in 1963. Best known for his novels and wide-ranging output of essays, he also published short stories, poetry, travel writing, and film stories and scripts. Through his novels and essays, Huxley functioned as an examiner and sometimes critic of social mores, norms, and ideals. Huxley was a humanist but was also interested at the end of his life in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. By the end of his life, Huxley was widely acknowledged as one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time.

 
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